takealookatyourlife:

ed0ro:

Indian Gang Rape Protests

New Delhi & Kolkata

December 27, 2012

AP Photo/Altaf Qadri

Can’t help but feel like if this was an American protest it would have way more notes.

(via dippingstickssunshine)

pantslessprogressive:

[Trigger Warning: Rape Culture]
In case you were taking a break from the internet last night, you may have missed a firestorm debate on rape culture last night, which continues as I write this. Since I have no purpose of this blog if I cannot conduct a debate with this community, I want to explain why I think using the lyrics such as “rape a pregnant bitch and call it a threesome” as a source of entertainment for the masses is morally reprehensible. 
I’m going to quickly discuss Tyler the Creator, who is the reason why I commented on rape culture last night. However, many of you told me to look him up, so I did. That helped in understanding his character and - to his detriment - in understanding who he really seems to be… which is a homophobic, misogynistic asshole.
“I just say ‘faggot’ and use ‘gay’ as an adjective to describe stupid shit.” [source]
“I’m not homophobic. I just think faggot hits and hurts people. It hits. And gay just means you’re stupid. I don’t know, we don’t think about it, we’re just kids. We don’t think about that shit. But I don’t hate gay people. I don’t want anyone to think I’m homophobic. ([His friend] Jasper walks into the room) But he’s a fucking faggot!” [source]
When hundreds of you explain Tyler to me as a thoughtful artist who uses these insults to add value to the art of music, yet he tells us he uses the word gay because it hurts people and then dismisses it saying, “we don’t think about it,” then I have a really hard time continuing this part of the debate further. I admittedly don’t know much about Tyler the Creator, and I guarantee I have read more favorable comments than unfavorable ones. However, I see his lyrics as gratuitously vicious with purposefully little regard for the negative societal impact he could cause. Continue to brush aside my sentiment as uptight, but this is how I view similarly reckless artists who have come before him (easiest example: Eminem).
Here’s the thing, though: this is ultimately not about Tyler the Creator - and I don’t think the argument here is whether or not rape culture exists. Rather, it’s whether these songs contribute to rape culture. I believe this kind of language perpetuates rape culture. Many of you disagree.
My rage is not meant to suggest that everyone who listens to Tyler the Creator condones rape. My disappointment is not meant to suggest that this single song lyric will lead to rape.
Here’s what I believe: anyone who uses rape to add value to their art without the clear intention of drawing attention to the casual nature of victim blaming, rape apologism and sexual objectification is either apathetic or willfully misguided. One hell of an expectation I have, no? Absolutely. 
We need to do what we can to actively combat the destructive nature of objectification and misogyny in our society. Anything that potentially hinders that goal sends a red flag off in my head. Reading lyrics from a musical artist’s character saying, “rape a pregnant bitch and call it a threesome” sends off hundreds of red flags in my brain. That is vile, disgusting language, no matter who says it. His character may be widely understood to be an evil being. Why was he created, though? To entertain us. I find nothing entertaining about bashing gay people, singing “by the way, we do punch bitches,” and singing “starve her ‘til I carve her then I shove her in the Rover/ Where I cut her like a barber with a Parkinson’s disorder/ Store her in a portable freezer with me to Portland.” I simply do not see the artistic value here, whether it’s Tyler or Eminem or anyone else.
I do not like when someone reduces rape to the convenience of fulfilling your character’s evil desires in order to add entertainment value. 
I wish there was a looming stigma every time someone thought about diluting rape down to a joke or a form of entertainment.
Rape is the intent to exude power in order to suck the life out of someone else.
Rape is dehumanization.
Having read hundreds of the literally thousands of responses to RFN and I, I do now understand what arguments lead some of you to believe that Tyler’s language is not harmful. I don’t agree, but I understand. My opinion is that it can be harmful. I do not see the usefulness in creating this character he portrays. However, one email I received did a great job of breaking down why they see a purpose behind Tyler’s language:
Tyler’s importance as a rapper has nothing to do with his lyrics specifically, but rather with WHAT he is doing as a whole. He is not encouraging or glorifying rape and murder. He is terrifyingly vulgar because he is pushing the envelope, testing everyone; driving them to their limits, more or less to see exactly what happens. It’s a cultural statement that has been made in the past but needs to be made as long as people continue to forget what they learn about themselves. Critics often write off “shock value” artists, but I feel it’s a necessary part of societal examination. SEE: Lenny Bruce, George Carlin, Allen Ginsberg, etc. It’s no different, and the fact that many people are reacting the same way you are means, well, he’s winning. He’s doing EXACTLY what he intended.
Also, what he says in his songs has nothing to do with him. He is not a rapist or a murderer, obviously (and has addressed this repeatedly, in interviews and even on the album itself). He has created a fictional world in which he and his friends operate as the embodiment of all evil. As a listener, you are not “supposed” to like it or identify with it. You are only meant to consider it, think about what is being communicated, and think about why it might be appealing to listen to.
This is a reasonable argument on the intrinsic value of musical art that some of you likely agree with. I don’t agree because I cannot accept this perpetually dismissive attitude towards rape; I see these lyrics as doing more harm than good. But maybe that’s the point. He may not want to encourage rape, but he uses verses on rape and murder to shock people… to get them talking. But where is the conversation going? You tell me. Let’s see where it goes. 
Many responses to this comment were to the tune of “calm down” and “don’t take it so seriously.” Here’s what it boils down to, folks: people who don’t take rape culture seriously are the reason why I take it seriously. 
If you want to continue this conversation with me, or merely explain why you don’t agree, feel free to email me: pantslessprogressive at gmail.
[Above: a quote from Transforming a Rape Culture]

pantslessprogressive:

[Trigger Warning: Rape Culture]

In case you were taking a break from the internet last night, you may have missed a firestorm debate on rape culture last night, which continues as I write this. Since I have no purpose of this blog if I cannot conduct a debate with this community, I want to explain why I think using the lyrics such as “rape a pregnant bitch and call it a threesome” as a source of entertainment for the masses is morally reprehensible. 

I’m going to quickly discuss Tyler the Creator, who is the reason why I commented on rape culture last night. However, many of you told me to look him up, so I did. That helped in understanding his character and - to his detriment - in understanding who he really seems to be… which is a homophobic, misogynistic asshole.

  • “I just say ‘faggot’ and use ‘gay’ as an adjective to describe stupid shit.” [source]
  • “I’m not homophobic. I just think faggot hits and hurts people. It hits. And gay just means you’re stupid. I don’t know, we don’t think about it, we’re just kids. We don’t think about that shit. But I don’t hate gay people. I don’t want anyone to think I’m homophobic. ([His friend] Jasper walks into the room) But he’s a fucking faggot!” [source]

When hundreds of you explain Tyler to me as a thoughtful artist who uses these insults to add value to the art of music, yet he tells us he uses the word gay because it hurts people and then dismisses it saying, “we don’t think about it,” then I have a really hard time continuing this part of the debate further. I admittedly don’t know much about Tyler the Creator, and I guarantee I have read more favorable comments than unfavorable ones. However, I see his lyrics as gratuitously vicious with purposefully little regard for the negative societal impact he could cause. Continue to brush aside my sentiment as uptight, but this is how I view similarly reckless artists who have come before him (easiest example: Eminem).

Here’s the thing, though: this is ultimately not about Tyler the Creator - and I don’t think the argument here is whether or not rape culture exists. Rather, it’s whether these songs contribute to rape culture. I believe this kind of language perpetuates rape culture. Many of you disagree.

My rage is not meant to suggest that everyone who listens to Tyler the Creator condones rape. My disappointment is not meant to suggest that this single song lyric will lead to rape.

Here’s what I believe: anyone who uses rape to add value to their art without the clear intention of drawing attention to the casual nature of victim blaming, rape apologism and sexual objectification is either apathetic or willfully misguided. One hell of an expectation I have, no? Absolutely. 

We need to do what we can to actively combat the destructive nature of objectification and misogyny in our society. Anything that potentially hinders that goal sends a red flag off in my head. Reading lyrics from a musical artist’s character saying, “rape a pregnant bitch and call it a threesome” sends off hundreds of red flags in my brain. That is vile, disgusting language, no matter who says it. His character may be widely understood to be an evil being. Why was he created, though? To entertain us. I find nothing entertaining about bashing gay people, singing “by the way, we do punch bitches,” and singing “starve her ‘til I carve her then I shove her in the Rover/ Where I cut her like a barber with a Parkinson’s disorder/ Store her in a portable freezer with me to Portland.” I simply do not see the artistic value here, whether it’s Tyler or Eminem or anyone else.

I do not like when someone reduces rape to the convenience of fulfilling your character’s evil desires in order to add entertainment value. 

I wish there was a looming stigma every time someone thought about diluting rape down to a joke or a form of entertainment.

Rape is the intent to exude power in order to suck the life out of someone else.

Rape is dehumanization.

Having read hundreds of the literally thousands of responses to RFN and I, I do now understand what arguments lead some of you to believe that Tyler’s language is not harmful. I don’t agree, but I understand. My opinion is that it can be harmful. I do not see the usefulness in creating this character he portrays. However, one email I received did a great job of breaking down why they see a purpose behind Tyler’s language:

Tyler’s importance as a rapper has nothing to do with his lyrics specifically, but rather with WHAT he is doing as a whole. He is not encouraging or glorifying rape and murder. He is terrifyingly vulgar because he is pushing the envelope, testing everyone; driving them to their limits, more or less to see exactly what happens. It’s a cultural statement that has been made in the past but needs to be made as long as people continue to forget what they learn about themselves. Critics often write off “shock value” artists, but I feel it’s a necessary part of societal examination. SEE: Lenny Bruce, George Carlin, Allen Ginsberg, etc. It’s no different, and the fact that many people are reacting the same way you are means, well, he’s winning. He’s doing EXACTLY what he intended.

Also, what he says in his songs has nothing to do with him. He is not a rapist or a murderer, obviously (and has addressed this repeatedly, in interviews and even on the album itself). He has created a fictional world in which he and his friends operate as the embodiment of all evil. As a listener, you are not “supposed” to like it or identify with it. You are only meant to consider it, think about what is being communicated, and think about why it might be appealing to listen to.

This is a reasonable argument on the intrinsic value of musical art that some of you likely agree with. I don’t agree because I cannot accept this perpetually dismissive attitude towards rape; I see these lyrics as doing more harm than good. But maybe that’s the point. He may not want to encourage rape, but he uses verses on rape and murder to shock people… to get them talking. But where is the conversation going? You tell me. Let’s see where it goes. 

Many responses to this comment were to the tune of “calm down” and “don’t take it so seriously.” Here’s what it boils down to, folks: people who don’t take rape culture seriously are the reason why I take it seriously. 

If you want to continue this conversation with me, or merely explain why you don’t agree, feel free to email me: pantslessprogressive at gmail.

[Above: a quote from Transforming a Rape Culture]

pantslessprogressive:

reallyfoxnews:

Good morning, Tumblr.
I love the internet. I really do. I defend it all the time and appreciate the ability to share information, say what you’re thinking, and sometimes even say the things you may be hesitant to share in a face to face conversation. So this morning, I have an apology.
I am sorry, Tumblr, I am sorry that I feel homophobia, sexism, and misogyny do not deserve MTV music awards. I am sorry that lyrics like “Starve her til I carve her and shove her in the Rover, cut her like a barber with Parkinson’s disorder,” “fuck coke because I’m snorting Hitler’s ashes,” and “I’m not weird, you’re just a faggot” are offensive to me. I’m sorry I don’t understand the “satire.” I’m sorry that I don’t find him tweeting “If Tegan or Sara need a hard dick hit me up” funny, satirical, or anything less than insulting, disgusting, and offensive. I’m sorry that I don’t think this person is a role model. I’m sorry that everyone on Tumblr is psychic and automatically knows that I have only listened to one Tyler the Creator song, and that I love Eminem and Chis Brown and they win awards and no one cares. Actually, I’m sorry that I didn’t include the long list of other people whose music I find too offensive to be winning televised music awards, Eminem included, in that post. I should have also probably mentioned how distasteful I find Chris Brown’s performance and career in general. But thanks, Tumblr, for clearing that up for me, and for your insightful suggestions. 
I’m sorry that I don’t see the pleasure, humor, or sense in telling random people in the internet to “go fuck themselves” or that they are “worthless piece of shit bloggers” over a disagreement of musical taste. Actually, over anything. I’m sure everyone is proud of themselves, sitting at their computers, offering this wonderful commentary on what has turned out to be, surprisingly, and interesting reblog discussion about the intent and context of Tyler the Creator’s music.
I never post anything on this blog expecting everyone to agree with me. If that were the case, what would be the point of blogging? Tumblr is a fascinating, fast-paced community, and disagreement often spurs intellectual conversation and I find that I usually learn something. I get messages, telling me that I’m wrong, I’m a liberal, I’m stupid, whatever but this, however, this is different. What are you going to achieve, telling someone they are a fucking idiot because they don’t agree with you? How can you blatantly be so sure that you fucking hate someone you don’t know? 
Before I go on a tangent cyber-bullying rant, I’ll end this here. We live in a rape culture. We live in a world where people - young women especially - idolize men who continually talk about - and do - rape, kill, and abuse women. And we live in a world where men do it to each other, too. If the intent is satirical, it is misguided. If the lyrics of a song are too vulgar, too offensive to play on the radio or be performed on television, if the audience of a show is mostly young people, if the acceptance speech is going to be a curse-ridden tirade directed towards children, what does giving that “artist” and award say to the world? What does it say to women, to children, to homosexuals, to anyone who lives below the privilege line? 
Rappers can rap about whatever they want. Singers can sing about whatever they want. You can stand on your corner with your protest sign, and everyone can tell you what they think. However, that doesn’t mean that you should be getting any awards for your twisted, disgusting, hate-ridden words. 
I’m taking a few days Tumblr break. The responses to the Tyler the Creator post have sickened and disgusted me to a point where I don’t want to be anywhere near my computer. The messages I have received have reminded me what a cruel lover the Internet can be, and how quickly the hateful commentary and overuse of profanity that I try to keep off my blog has surfaced. So me and my worthless piece of shit blogger ass will drink some tea, catch up on some sleep, and see you all in a little while for regularly scheduled RFN programming. 
Let the inbox overflow commence. 

 +1.
Last night, after joining RFN’s sentiment, my inbox now looks the same. The level of hate is surprising, despite my hyper-awareness of the lack of civility the internet often offers up. I have my own response as well, which I’ll post later tonight, so you all have a better understanding of my thoughts on rape culture and why I think using the above lyrics as a source of entertainment for the masses is morally reprehensible.
I thank those of you who criticize my argument in a civil manner. RFN and I are open to disagreement, but not like what you see above. It’s utterly pointless in advancing this conversation.

pantslessprogressive:

reallyfoxnews:

Good morning, Tumblr.

I love the internet. I really do. I defend it all the time and appreciate the ability to share information, say what you’re thinking, and sometimes even say the things you may be hesitant to share in a face to face conversation. So this morning, I have an apology.

I am sorry, Tumblr, I am sorry that I feel homophobia, sexism, and misogyny do not deserve MTV music awards. I am sorry that lyrics like “Starve her til I carve her and shove her in the Rover, cut her like a barber with Parkinson’s disorder,” “fuck coke because I’m snorting Hitler’s ashes,” and “I’m not weird, you’re just a faggot” are offensive to me. I’m sorry I don’t understand the “satire.” I’m sorry that I don’t find him tweeting “If Tegan or Sara need a hard dick hit me up” funny, satirical, or anything less than insulting, disgusting, and offensive. I’m sorry that I don’t think this person is a role model. I’m sorry that everyone on Tumblr is psychic and automatically knows that I have only listened to one Tyler the Creator song, and that I love Eminem and Chis Brown and they win awards and no one cares. Actually, I’m sorry that I didn’t include the long list of other people whose music I find too offensive to be winning televised music awards, Eminem included, in that post. I should have also probably mentioned how distasteful I find Chris Brown’s performance and career in general. But thanks, Tumblr, for clearing that up for me, and for your insightful suggestions. 

I’m sorry that I don’t see the pleasure, humor, or sense in telling random people in the internet to “go fuck themselves” or that they are “worthless piece of shit bloggers” over a disagreement of musical taste. Actually, over anything. I’m sure everyone is proud of themselves, sitting at their computers, offering this wonderful commentary on what has turned out to be, surprisingly, and interesting reblog discussion about the intent and context of Tyler the Creator’s music.

I never post anything on this blog expecting everyone to agree with me. If that were the case, what would be the point of blogging? Tumblr is a fascinating, fast-paced community, and disagreement often spurs intellectual conversation and I find that I usually learn something. I get messages, telling me that I’m wrong, I’m a liberal, I’m stupid, whatever but this, however, this is different. What are you going to achieve, telling someone they are a fucking idiot because they don’t agree with you? How can you blatantly be so sure that you fucking hate someone you don’t know? 

Before I go on a tangent cyber-bullying rant, I’ll end this here. We live in a rape culture. We live in a world where people - young women especially - idolize men who continually talk about - and do - rape, kill, and abuse women. And we live in a world where men do it to each other, too. If the intent is satirical, it is misguided. If the lyrics of a song are too vulgar, too offensive to play on the radio or be performed on television, if the audience of a show is mostly young people, if the acceptance speech is going to be a curse-ridden tirade directed towards children, what does giving that “artist” and award say to the world? What does it say to women, to children, to homosexuals, to anyone who lives below the privilege line? 

Rappers can rap about whatever they want. Singers can sing about whatever they want. You can stand on your corner with your protest sign, and everyone can tell you what they think. However, that doesn’t mean that you should be getting any awards for your twisted, disgusting, hate-ridden words. 

I’m taking a few days Tumblr break. The responses to the Tyler the Creator post have sickened and disgusted me to a point where I don’t want to be anywhere near my computer. The messages I have received have reminded me what a cruel lover the Internet can be, and how quickly the hateful commentary and overuse of profanity that I try to keep off my blog has surfaced. So me and my worthless piece of shit blogger ass will drink some tea, catch up on some sleep, and see you all in a little while for regularly scheduled RFN programming. 

Let the inbox overflow commence. 

 +1.

Last night, after joining RFN’s sentiment, my inbox now looks the same. The level of hate is surprising, despite my hyper-awareness of the lack of civility the internet often offers up. I have my own response as well, which I’ll post later tonight, so you all have a better understanding of my thoughts on rape culture and why I think using the above lyrics as a source of entertainment for the masses is morally reprehensible.

I thank those of you who criticize my argument in a civil manner. RFN and I are open to disagreement, but not like what you see above. It’s utterly pointless in advancing this conversation.

(via pantslessprogressive)